A Look at the Triple Extortion Ransomware

 

Ransomware has traditionally concentrated on encryption, but one of the most common recent additions is the exfiltration and threatening disclosure of critical data in a "double extortion" assault. Threat actors, on the other hand, must continually develop new ways to enhance the effect of a successful assault since the financial incentives are so high. One of the most recent methods is known as "triple extortion," which adds another way to extort money from targets. 

The prospect of stolen data being released online has been a typical point of leverage for criminals seeking further ransom payments in what is known as double extortion. More than 70% of ransomware assaults now include exfiltrate data, demonstrating how quickly this type of attack tactic has become the norm.

Threat actors have lately introduced another layer to ransomware assaults based on this approach. In other words, this latest ransomware advancement means that a ransomware assault no longer stops at the first victim. Ransom demands may now be directed towards a victim's clients or suppliers under triple extortion. At the same time, other pressure points such as DDoS attacks or direct media leaks are added to the mix. 

The more leverage the perpetrators have in a ransomware assault, the more likely the victim is to pay. If the gang is successful in not just encrypting vital systems but also downloading sensitive data and threatening to leak it, they will have the upper hand and will be able to demand payment if the victim does not have sufficient backup procedures. 

According to Brian Linder, a cybersecurity evangelist at Check Point Software, triple extortion has become more common in the previous six months, with ransomware gangs making robocalls to customers, shareholders, partners, the press, and financial analysts if the victimised organisation fails to fall victim to the first two extortion efforts. 

“So, imagine if you don’t pay the ransom, we’re going to let all the stock analysts know that you’ve been attacked and likely drive some percentage of your market value out of the market,” Linder says. “We do expect this to be highly exploited. It’s fairly easy to do.” 

Depending on the attacker's initial effectiveness in infiltrating the network, they can get access to information about the victim's clients, including names and phone numbers, and have automated messages ready to go. 

Companies and organizations that retain client or customer data, as well as their own, are the most apparent targets for ransomware operations that go beyond single or double extortion. Healthcare organizations are obvious targets in this regard. As a result, the first known instance of triple extortion occurred late last year when hackers obtained access to Vastaamo, a Finnish physiotherapy provider. Threat actors demanded money directly from the thousands of Vastaamo clients whose records they were able to exfiltrate, rather than contacting the provider for a ransom.